In the news

Rosanne Haggerty

Rosanne Haggerty featured in Irish America Magazine

Tuesday, November 13, 2018
When Rosanne Haggerty was a girl, her family went to a church in downtown Hartford that was across from a worn, single-room-occupancy (SRO) rooming house. Over time the Haggertys got to know some of the residents, even invited them to their home for holiday meals.
 
It was an introduction to the importance of housing for the poor and lit the spark of what has become a remarkable career. First, Haggerty pioneered “supportive housing,” housing with treatment, counseling, and other services on the site.

Permanent Supportive Housing Helps Homeless Veterans get Back on Their Feet

Thursday, November 8, 2018
Did you know that it costs more money for many people to remain homeless than it does to place them in permanent supportive housing?
 
It’s true! Due to the likelihood of homeless individuals cycling through emergency health care, shelters and the criminal justice system, we can actually save 40% more taxpayer dollars by investing in ending the cycle of homelessness for some of our most vulnerable neighbors.
 
The solution to ending homelessness is very simple: help individuals who are experiencing homelessness find permanent homes.
Tableau

Tableau to Donate $100 Million through Tableau Foundation to Help Solve Global Challenges

Thursday, November 8, 2018

Today at the Tableau Conference in New Orleans, Tableau Software (NYSE: DATA) announced its commitment to grant $100 million in software, training, and financial support through Tableau Foundation between now and the year 2025. The company is pledging to help more people use data to take on some of the world's toughest challenges including global health, poverty, equality, and climate change. This commitment includes an equity donation of $25 million by Tableau early next year to fund the Foundation's work.

(Cloe Poisson / Hartford Courant)

In Hartford, A Few Blocks Can Make All The Difference For Children Growing Out Of Poverty

Friday, October 5, 2018

Developers broke ground last month one of the biggest elements of the Promise Zone plan, revitalizing the long-vacant M. Swift & Sons factory to create an employment and training hub for residents of the 3-square-mile area, which encompasses the Clay Arsenal, Northeast and Upper Albany neighborhoods.

That project is led by Elliott, director of the North Hartford Partnership of New Haven-based Community Solutions. Now, she’s looking for her team’s next project in the neighborhood by tracking evictions and abandoned buildings, 911 calls and housing code violations.

Community Solutions President Rosanne Haggerty

Interview with Rosanne Haggerty

Monday, October 1, 2018
In such a booming economy, why is homelessness spiking and affordable housing reaching a crisis in many U.S. cities?
Homelessness is not spiking everywhere, but I would say it’s the failure of housing policy and practice to adapt quickly to changing demographics and dynamics.

A former Connecticut factory will transform into a job incubator

Thursday, September 27, 2018

The Swift Gold Leaf Factory in Hartford, Connecticut, will be converted into a major community job incubator by New York-based nonprofit Community Solutions and Massachusetts design firm Bruner/Cott Architects. The $34-million adaptive reuse project aims to spur investment in the low-income neighborhood of Northeast Hartford and bring restaurant industry job opportunities to a place where the unemployment rate has hit 26 percent in recent years. 

Rendering of the Livonia 4 development in Brownsville, Brooklyn

Brooklyn Neighborhood Set to Get 900 Affordable Apartments as Part of $1 Billion Plan

Thursday, July 26, 2018

New York City has selected three developers to build nearly 900 apartments on three city-owned lots in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Brownsville as part of a $1 billion revitalization plan for area.

The proposals outlined in the Brownsville Plan’s one-year progress report, which was released Thursday, focus on affordable housing, job creation, new community facilities and public spaces.

 

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